Selling shoes, books, uniform not your mandate: Minister tells private schools

In his address to the gathering, the education minister said the proprietors of private schools have invested their money and have right to earn but “through legal means”.

Syed Rizwan Geelani
Srinagar, Publish Date: May 18 2018 12:00AM | Updated Date: May 18 2018 12:00AM
Selling shoes, books, uniform not your mandate: Minister tells private schoolsFile Photo

The private schools have a mandate to impart education to the students, not to sell the shoes, the text books or the uniforms, minister for education Choudhary Zulfkar Ali said at a function organized by J&K joint coordination committee of private schools (JKJCCPS) at a hotel here.

In his address to the gathering, the education minister said the proprietors of private schools have invested their money and have right to earn but “through legal means”.

“If you have established a school then your mandate is to teach. You don’t have permission to sell shoes, uniform or text books. Private schools contribute to education sector but still parents have grievances against your schools,” he said, adding that the black sheep in the private schools should be isolated by the association itself.

“As education minister it is my responsibility to promote private education sector but at the same time you (private schools) have to run your schools through legal means so that government doesn’t receive any complaints against you,” he said.

The minister said the private schools have been declared as “money minting machines” by parents and same perception is among the common masses.

The minister, however, said the government will amend SRO 123 and remove some of its “unreasonable” provisions.

Zulfkar said the education has become the worst causality of prevailing situation. “I got a report that schools remained closed for 32 days in two months. This is the level of crisis we are facing,” he said, adding that government and private sector has to work hand in hand to make education sector flourish.

“How can our students perform in competitive exams if schools remain closed for 32 days in two months? Well off in Kashmir go to Jammu to ensure study of their children as they know hartals and restrictions won't close schools there, but we have to think about future of the majority of the students who don’t move out of Kashmir,” he said. The minister stated that a class on moral education will be mandatory and compulsory in all the schools. “Government will issue formal orders for it.”